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Windows 8 : Customizing the Start Screen (part 5) - Adding Shutdown and Restart Tiles to the Start Screen, Customizing the Start Screen Background
While the Start screen does offer a few productivity improvements—at-a-glance info with live tiles, one-click app launching, as-you-type searching—there are a few tasks that are maddeningly (and, in our view, unnecessarily) inefficient.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Start Screen (part 4) - Pinning a Website to the Start Screen,Displaying the Administrative Tools on the Start Screen
Some of these tools are relatively easy to launch. For example, you can press Windows Logo+X to display a menu that includes Event Viewer, Disk Management, Computer Management, and a few other administrative tools .
Windows 8 : Customizing the Start Screen (part 3) - Turning Off a Live Tile, Pinning a Program to the Start Screen
If you’d like to see no live content for a minute or two, you can temporarily turn off all live tiles. From the Start screen, display the Charms menu and then click Settings (or just press Windows Logo+I), click Tiles, and then click Clear.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Start Screen (part 2) - Creating an App Group
If you examine the default Start screen, you notice a gap between the four “lifestyle” apps (News, Sports, Travel, and Finance) on the right, and the rest of the apps on the left.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Start Screen (part 1) - Resizing a Tile, Moving a Tile
The Start screen tiles come in two sizes: small, as seen with the Internet Explorer and Store tiles, and large, as seen with the Mail and Calendar tiles. The large size is useful for tiles that are live, because the tile has more room to display information.
Windows 8 : Creating and using Hyper-V virtual machines (part 3) - Using a Hyper-V virtual machine
After a virtual machine is created and running, you can install an operating system as long as valid physical or virtual media are provided to the virtual machine. When the virtual machine starts, it goes through a boot sequence much like that of a physical PC.
Windows 8 : Creating and using Hyper-V virtual machines (part 2) - Creating a new virtual machine
Dynamic memory provides a base amount of memory that Windows needs at startup and then increases as needed. This is known as startup memory and might not be as much as the defined amount of memory in the New Virtual Machine Wizard.
Windows 8 : Creating and using Hyper-V virtual machines (part 1) - Planning your virtual machines
Each situation in which you might create a virtual machine is different. Therefore, the decision to create a virtual machine must be based on the needs of the particular situation and the policies of your organization.
Learning about Hyper-V for Windows 8 (part 3) - What you need to know to succeed
Getting started with Hyper-V is easy, but a number of points should be addressed ahead of time. In addition to how and when Hyper-V will be used, you will also need a thorough understanding of a number of critical elements of the virtualization technology as a whole so you will be successful.
Learning about Hyper-V for Windows 8 (part 2) - Enabling Hyper-V
The Hyper-V hypervisor is included with Windows 8 but must be enabled. This means it is a feature and can be added easily with Windows. Before you enable this feature, make sure you have the right configuration.
Learning about Hyper-V for Windows 8 (part 1) - Introducing Hyper-V for Windows 8
If you are new to virtualization, Windows 8 is the perfect platform to familiarize you with virtualization. For a number of reasons, it is a great technology that will enable you to do more with your computing environment.
Windows Server 2012 Technology Primer : Improvements for Continuous Availability (part 2) - Hyper-V Replication
With Windows Server 2012, continuous availability now extends between sites; so, beyond local clustering and high availability, organizations can now do disaster recovery and business continuity with site-level guest session replication.
Windows Server 2012 Technology Primer : Improvements for Continuous Availability (part 1) - No Single Point of Failure in Clustering,Stretched Clusters, 64-Node Clusters
Although clustering of servers has been around for a long time in Windows (dating back to Windows NT 4.0, when it was available, but really didn’t work), clustering in Windows Server 2012 now not only works, but also provides a series of significant improvements.
Windows Server 2012 Technology Primer : Versions of Windows Server 2012
Microsoft has greatly simplified the licensing and version options for Windows Server 2012. There are effectively only two versions of Windows Server 2012 now: the Standard edition and the Datacenter edition.
Windows Server 2012 Technology Primer : When Is the Right Time to Migrate?
Every time a new version of Windows ships, organizations wonder when the right time to migrate to the new operating system. It used to be that you waited until the first service pack shipped before installing any Microsoft product.
Windows Server 2012 Technology Primer : Windows Server 2012 Defined - Windows Server 2012 as an Application Server
As much as there have been significant improvements in Windows Server 2012 under the hood that greatly enhance the performance, reliability, and scalability of Windows Server 2012 in the enterprise, Windows servers have always been exceptional application servers hosting critical business applications for organizations.
Windows Server 2012 Technology Primer : Windows Server 2012 Defined - Windows Server 2012 Under the Hood
Introduced in Windows Server 2012 is Server Message Block 3.0, more commonly called SMB3 or SMB for short. SMB is a protocol that handles the transfer of files between systems.
Windows 7 : Protecting Your Files - Using Backup and Restore (part 2) - Backing up the entire PC with an image, Restoring from an image to a new hard drive
The Create a System Image link in the Backup and Restore Center backs up everything on your primary hard drive (drive C:). That includes Windows 7 and all of your installed programs.
Windows 7 : Protecting Your Files - Using Backup and Restore (part 1) - Backing up files and settings
The Backup and Restore Center backs up all user files and personal settings in all user accounts by default. It does not back up Windows or any installed programs. Its main purpose is to make sure that you can recover documents like pictures, music, videos, and such in case you lose the originals on your hard drive.
Windows 7 : Protecting Your Files - Simple File Backups
The Backup and Restore Center, introduced in Windows Vista and carried over to Windows 7, is a big improvement over the Backup programs from Windows XP and before.
Using the Windows 8 Interface : Working with Running Apps - Searching via the Start Screen
If you use your PC regularly, there’s an excellent chance that its hard drive is crammed with thousands, perhaps even tens of thousands, of files that take up hundreds, perhaps even thousands, of gigabytes
Using the Windows 8 Interface : Working with Running Apps - Working with Notifications
If you’re a Windows old-timer, then you’re certainly all too familiar with the notification area in the taskbar, which displays banners whenever Windows or an application has information for you.
Using the Windows 8 Interface : Working with Running Apps - Switching Between Running Apps
You can also switch to another Windows 8 app using the keyboard. For example, you can quickly switch between the current Windows 8 app and the Start screen by pressing the Windows Logo key.
Using the Windows 8 Interface : Working with Running Apps - Snapping an App
One way that you can take advantage of the hidden “windowness” of Windows 8 apps is to show two Windows 8 apps onscreen at the same time. So, for example, you could display your Finance app stock watchlist while simultaneously surfing the Web, or watch what your Facebook friends are up to while also shopping in the Windows Store.
: Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Administrative (.adm) Templates (part 5) - Policies vs. Preferences
Policies are registry-based settings that can be fully managed by administrators and Group Policy. These are also referred to as true policies. In contrast, registry-based settings that are configured by users or are set as a default state by the operating system at installation are referred to as preferences.
: Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Administrative (.adm) Templates (part 4) - Managing .adm Templates
Over time, you will make changes to the custom .adm templates that you have implemented within your GPOs. Built-in controls are available that help update new versions of the .adm templates. To make this process easier, it is best to have a dedicated workstation for creating and modifying GPOs.
: Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Administrative (.adm) Templates (part 3) - Adding .adm Templates
Let’s look at an example in which you need to add the Visio11.adm template to a GPO named OFFICE11. The Visio11.adm template is currently located on the desktop of the computer from which you are editing the GPO.
: Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Administrative (.adm) Templates (part 2) - Default Installed .adm Templates
Every new GPO has default Administrative Template sections. These sections are created by three or more .adm templates, depending on the operating system you are working with.
: Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Administrative (.adm) Templates (part 1) - Default .adm Templates
Every computer running Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows Server 2003 comes with some default .adm templates. These files are used to create the default interface under the Administrative Templates portions of a GPO.
Using the Windows 8 Interface : Navigating the Start Screen (part 3) - Navigating the Start Screen with a Touch Interface
We used to always say that Windows was built with the mouse in mind. After all, the easiest way to use screen elements such as the Start menu, the taskbar, toolbars, ribbons, and dialog boxes was via mouse manipulation.
 
 
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